Anna Lindholm

Research Interests

Behavioural ecology, ecology, evolutionary genetics, cooperation, selfish genes, social behaviour, social selection

CV

Education and Professional Positions

2015 Venia Legendi, University of Zurich, Switzerland
2006 - present Independent Group Leader, Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Switzerland
2001 - 2005 Australia Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow and Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching and Research Award Fellow, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
1998 - 2000 Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
1992 - 1997 Ph.D. Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
1985 - 1990 B.Sc. Zoology at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Selected Publications

  • Lindholm AK., Dyer KA., Firman RC., Fishman L., Forstmeier W., Holman L., Johannesson H., Knief U., Kokko H., Larracuente AM., Manser A., Montchamp-Moreau C., Petrosyan VG., Pomiankowski A., Presgraves DC., Safronova LD., Sutter A., Unckless RL., Verspoor RL., Wedell N., Wilkinson GS., Price TA. (2016) The ecology and evolutionary dynamics of meiotic drive. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 31(4):315-326. DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2016.02.001
  • Sutter A., Lindholm AK. (2016) The copulatory plug delays ejaculation by rival males and affects sperm competition outcome in house mice. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 29(8):1617-1630. DOI: 10.1111/jeb.12898
  • Manser A., König B., Lindholm AK. (2015) Female house mice avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males in a mate choice experiment. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 28(1):54-64. DOI: 10.1111/jeb.12525
  • Sutter A., Lindholm AK. (2015) Detrimental effects of an autosomal selfish genetic element on sperm competitiveness in house mice. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B: Biological Sciences, 282(1811):20150974. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0974
  • Auclair Y., König B., Lindholm AK. (2014) Socially mediated polyandry: a new benefit of communal nesting in mammals. Behavioral Ecology:1-7. DOI: 10.1093/beheco/aru143